Post 227 – The Granites – Currawinya National Park

iancollard
October 4, 2020

Currawinga National Park

Heading into The Granites there are lot of these mud mounds. These are the remains of natural springs that used to flow naturally from the artesian basin.

The Granites

The theory is that the granite forming these formations extends all the way down to the the artesian water. The granite forms a block and provides cracks and faults for the water to find its way to the surface.

Post 226 – Currawinga National Park

iancollard
October 4, 2020

Currawinga National Park

The washing is up to date. The road from Thargomindah to Cameron's corner is still closed but we can get from Eulo down to Currawinga National Park and Hungerford.

This is a steam engine and pump at the aptly named pump hole.

Corni Paroo water hole

We didn't camp here but this spot was probably nicer than where we did camp.

Currawinga shearing shed

Our camp site was on Ourimperee water hole within walking distance to the shearing shed.

Ourimperee water hole

Early morning at Ourimperee water hole. While not obvious in this shot the water is like a lot of western water systems and muddy brown.

Currawinya shearing shed

Inside the 10 stand shed - 6 stands down one side and 4 on the other.

Currawinya shearers quarters

The shearing shed sits amongst a group of supportive structures including a managers house that looks pretty much as if it was permanently inhabited with a chook pen.

Currawinya

We left the shearing shed and headed for our next camp at Myninya campground.

Post 225 – Thargomindah

iancollard
October 4, 2020

Heading to Thargo

All the gravel roads are closed as a result of the rain. We head to the end of the bitumen - Thargomindah. Here we catch up on the washing and see what happens with the roads.

Waiting in the deck chairs on the banks for the Bulloo River.

Thargomindah windmill

I took the opportunity to practice some night time photography.

This windmill is part of a display for the original hydro power station for Thargomindah. The pressure from the artisan bore was used to drive a couple of generators for the town.

Post 224 – Eulo Storm photos from Ann’s phone

iancollard
October 4, 2020

Strom Clouds

Photos from Ann's phone. Clouds as we are heading west towards Eulo.

Eulo Dust

We were wondering why the clouds had a funny red hue. It didn't take us long to find out as we drove through first the dust, then the mud before getting to the rain.

Post 223 – Eulo

iancollard
September 22, 2020

Eulo

We had planned to stop on the banks of the Eulo Billabong for the night. Why would I let a storm stop our plans. (Ann has photos on her phone) but it was pretty impressive.

Any way we didn't make it to the Billabong. Apparently there  are limits to where even a four wheel drive can go. Short story is lucky we had a pair of Treds on board. We were able to eventually back out and head back to the Eulo Queen Hotel for a powered site and a pub meal.

Eulo

Reflections of the highlights of Eulo in the water after the storm. Actually near the old jail. The lizard racing track. Check out Ann's photo of the memorial plaque here. Not to mention the bore.

Eulo - Paroo River

The muddy brown waters of the Paroo River at Eulo.

Post 222 – Thruston National Park

iancollard
September 22, 2020

Thruston National Park

Thruston National Park is between St George and Cunamulla. It is an old sheep property that has been handed back or brought by National Parks. This homestead is pretty much beyond saving I am not what National Parks have planned for it. Nothing I suspect.

 

Thruston Homestead.

This was not the only dead roo under the house. I can only assume that in the middle of the drought these poor fellas came looking for the shade and basically a place to die.

 

Thruston Shearing Shed

While there seemed to be tracks everywhere we did find our way to the shearing shed where we spent the night. The shearing shed complex was more interesting. The shed was laid out differentially to what I had seen before with the sheep holding pens behind the shearer and the shorn sheep sliding down under the shed and under the holding pens.

The group of buildings were all still identifiable with the wash house, cook house, meat house, and shearers quarters.

There was also an old bore drain running down one side. I am not sure how far away the bore was. Some of the literature said the bores were all capped in 2007.

 

Post 221 – St George

iancollard
September 19, 2020

St George

We stayed at the River Gums caravanpark in St George. St George is actually larger than I envisaged. I rode along the banks of the Baloone river to discover the St George camp draft was in process. I wasn't inconspicuous with my mountain bike amongst the jeans akubras and horses.

 

 

 

St George

A walk along the river in the morning came across this interesting sculpture. I can only assume the the Baloone river is part of the Darling river system and that there are Murray cod in the Baloone.

 

 

 

St George

This is the current weir with steel gates and vehicular traffic over the river. I was also excited to find the remnants of the original bridge dating back to the late 1800s. This rocky causeway across the river was an ideal place to cross with cattle in the early days. This is perhaps the reason for the existence of St. George.

 

 

 

Post 220 – Lake Broadwater – Dalby

iancollard
September 19, 2020

Lake Broadwater - Dalby

The first night out on our western trip. Lake Broadwater is not far outside Dalby on the road to Moonie and St George.

The lake is natural and semi-permanent - is pretty low at the moment and signs are up prohibiting boating.

 

 

 

Lake Broadwater - Dalby

It was quite pleasant in the morning with the sun coming up over the lake.